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8f816ab2215e0c52b5bbd6a2acd4f39a62159356

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Score
3.64
Lars Hemel
Certification Level:
PADI
Certification Number:
PADI 471740
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Diving at a huge steel cargo freighter named the Bluefire

Name Dive Site:Bluefire
Depth: 88-108ft (27-33m)
Accessibility: Boat, Live-aboard
Inserted/Added by: lars, © Author: Lars Hemel
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The Bluefire Wreck or shortly Blue Fire as it is named as well, is a 175 foot steel passenger freighter originally based in Key West, Florida. She was used to transport goods to and from the Caribbean, but American Coast Guard seized her when many Cubans tried to enter Key West illegally during the 1980's. It was the Dade County Artificial Reef Program that sank the Bluefire in January 1983, which makes her one of the eldest artificial reefs in Florida. Nowadays, she lies in the Dade Sport Fishing Council Site North, slightly southeast of Fowey Lighthouse and because of its relatively solitude she is one of the less heavily visited dive sites.

The Bluefire is located upright in 120 feet of water on a brilliant white sandy bottom, which makes it a perfect site for photographers. Part of its hull has been broken away by a huge storm, but entering the ship is safe and easy also for not wreck specialists. Most of her internal structure is damaged, creating an open area for divers to navigate through. Its radar masts are still fully intact and some deck winches can still be found.

The wreck is literally filled with marine life. Filled with pelagic species such as cobia, amberjacks and barracuda, but also fish such as jewfish, snapper and groupers are common. Hundreds of reef fish such as parrotfish feed on the coral that grows on railings and ladders. There are many barracudas at its bow while stag horn coral, fans and sponges of all kinds of colours have started to take over the ship. There even are divers which have reported several kinds of reef shark and mantas but you have to be one of the more lucky divers to encounter them.



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